10 tips to prevent worry

worry

This is a blog post we published on 7/8/2009, and it seems as applicable today as it was then. Sharyn Mosca was a member of my National Speakers Association mastermind group. She died suddenly last fall.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

The times are daunting. It sometimes seems surreal that we slipped so far in our economic stature. Through the worry and uncertainty, here are some tips to keep you positive and sturdy.

1. You know this, but I am going to remind you that you know it…worry never helps anything. In fact, it usually blocks creative thinking and problem solving. There is an expression about worry: when you worry, you are paying interest in a debt you may not have. Place a card in front of your computer or other space where you spend most of your day. Write in large letters on the card:

I used to worry

It may take a while, but you will be smiling when you catch yourself choosing not to worry.

2. Fear is so very consuming. Write down the fearful thoughts you have and put a positive opposite next to it. Some examples:

I am afraid I will lose my job. If I lose my job, I will find another creative way to generate income

I lost money in the stock market, how can I make it up? I may or may not make it all up. I am lucky I am sitting here, healthy, and writing about it.

3. Blame often follows fear. Try reciting this phrase when you find yourself feeling sad and wanting to blame:

“Most people are well intended. Most people make the best decision they can at the time they are making them.”

4. Misery would like your company. The fear, blame and shame game needs players to play. The next time someone entices you to play fear, blame or shame; say; “I pass this time. My head needs positive and creative notions to get me through the tough times.”

5. Some have it worse than you. Make a habit of donating a few dollars to a local food bank, homeless shelter or other charity. Giving dollars now, even when money is tight, is a joyous thing. You will never feel better about giving than when you really can’t afford to.

6. Listen more to others. Offer encouragement. Be the wise person that you know you really are. Most people respond, heal and rejuvenate with surprisingly simple kindnesses. Make someone’s day.

7. Share your feelings. Don’t hold them back, but also share with integrity. Naming emotions like’ “I feel scared or tense” and adding a positive spin, “but I also have worked through fear before with success” helps you perpetuate strength in yourself and others.

8. Learn through this experience. Keep a journal. Record your thoughts, feelings, victories and losses large and small. Sometimes the economic situation can seem so harsh until we view it with hindsight. I have a friend who lost his job on Wall Street, lost all his savings and can’t sell his house to downsize. His aunt became really ill, and he is with her almost daily helping her recuperate. Your journal will tell you someday what this time really meant.

9. Learn some more. Notice how you have changed. Are some things now more important than before? Are your priorities different? Note it in your journal.

10. Lastly, know that I know you are a talented, caring, fun loving, genuine person. You indeed will persevere and come out ok.

By guest author Sharyn Mosca

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
This entry was posted in Personal observations and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>